5.

Negotiations in Dayton

SITE X: Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (Dayton, OH)

Site X

“Tom Donilon took over the responsibility for finding an acceptable place - which we code-named Site X - for the talks. Every detail mattered. Site X would have to hold nine delegations - each Balkan country, the five Contact Group nations, and EU representative Bildt. Ideally, we wanted an area we could seal off from the press and all other outsiders, close enough to Washington so that senior Administration officials could visit, yet sufficiently remote, as Michael Dobbs later put in the Washington Post: ‘to discourage Balkan warlords from running off to television studios in New York and Washington every time the negotiations hit a snag.’

The Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio, filled our needs. Site X would have to hold nine delegations - each Balkan country, the five Contact Group nations, and EU representative Bildt.”

(Excerpts from Richard Holbrooke’s book “To End a War”)


Dayton, Ohio (USA)

Dayton

“There was a real Dayton out there, a charming small Ohio city famous as the birthplace of the Wright Brothers. Its citizens energized us from the outset. Daytonians were proud to be part of history. Large signs at the commercial airport hailed Dayton as the ‘temporary centre of international peace’. The local newspapers and television covered the story from every angle. Families on the airbase placed ‘candles of peace’ in their front windows. One day, they formed a ‘peace chain’. Ohio’s famous ethnic diversity was also on display.”

(Excerpts from Richard Holbrooke’s book “To End a War”)